Joint Replacement

Areas of the body such as the knees, wrists, and hips can be severely affected by a number of conditions that limit range of motion and cause significant pain and discomfort. Cartilage of the joints can become worn down or trauma and disease, ultimately having an effect on your way of life. Joint replacement and other procedures involving treatment of damaged joints require extremely skilled and experienced orthopaedic surgeons. At All-Star Orthopaedics, Drs. Thomas M. Schott, Mark S. Greenberg, Bing S. Tsay and , Kevin M. Honig offer state-of-the-art techniques to help you reduce pain and improve mobility in areas affected by arthritis and other conditions.

Although we typically only recommend surgery after other methods, such as medication and physical therapy, have been attempted, the team here at All-Star Orthopedics includes a number of experts and specialists who can perform intricate surgical procedures designed to significantly improve your condition and reduce pain.

Hip Replacement
Partial Knee Joint Replacement
Knee Replacement
Patient Specific Knee Replacement
Osteoarthritis
Osteonecrosis
Shoulder Joint Replacement
Wrist Joint Replacement
Hylagen Injection
Joint Fluid Therapy
Joint injections

Please contact our practice for a consultation with one of our orthopaedic surgeons and joint replacement specialists here in the Dallas, Fort Worth, and North Texas region.

Hip Replacement

Hip replacement is a very common procedure, typically performed on patients affected by osteoarthritis (the gradual depletion of cartilage on the surface of the joints). Rheumatoid arthritis, osteonecrosis, injury, and other conditions can also necessitate hip replacement. Symptoms of hip arthritis are often characterized by aching pains in the hip that can be chronic or only occur occasionally. The pain from hip arthritis can sometimes also spread to the groin, thigh, buttock, and perhaps even the knee. Walking can sometimes become difficult with more pronounced pain from hip arthritis, and may ultimately cause one to require a cane or walker for better mobility. Less invasive treatment for hip arthritis can include over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications and/or physical therapy. For more advanced cases, surgery can be performed. Depending on the extent of the condition, surgery can include relatively minimally-invasive procedures such as smoothing of the joints or re-alignment of bones. More severe cases may require hip replacement surgery. The procedure involves removal of the top of the femure (thighbone) and using artificial implants to replace of the “ball-and-socket” mechanism of the hip. Hip replacement can be performed as a minimally invasive procedure, using only one or two small incisions. This typically allows patients to have an easier and quicker recovery process. Some hip surgeries can be performed as an outpatient; however, more invasive procedures often require a hospital stay.

Partial Knee Joint Replacement

Partial knee joint replacement is a minimally-invasive surgical procedure designed for patients with arthritis that affects only one part of the knee. In total knee replacement, all of the cartilage is removed; however, partial knee joint replacement involves removal of only the cartilage that has been damaged – the healthy cartilage can be left in place. This procedure typically requires a smaller incision and can result in a much quicker recovery time when compared to full knee replacement. Plus, patients often experience a more normal-feeling knee than they would following a total knee replacement procedure. Not all patients are candidates for this treatment. Our experienced orthopaedic surgeon will evaluate your needs and determine if partial knee replacement surgery is the best option for you.

Knee Replacement

Total knee replacement is known as one of the most successful surgical procedures in the field of surgery, and can help those with arthritis and other conditions affecting the knee reduce pain, increase range of motion, feel more comfortable standing and walking, and develop better strength in the knee area. The procedure involves the placement of the worn-out surfaces of cartilage in the joint with a prosthesis made of biocompatible metals and plastics. Although the procedure is referred to as “knee replacement,” it’s actually only the cartilage that is replaced. Knee replacement is typically performed on patients who suffer from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, which ultimately cause inflammation and eventual destruction of cartilage. Knee replacement generally requires a three to four day hospital stay. Patients can usually expect a recovery period of about three months to allow the knee to heal properly.

Visit our patient specific knee replacement page to learn more.

Amazing Advances In Knee Surgery – Dr. Schott on Good Morning Texas

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the gradual breaking down of cartilage of the joints. Typically affecting the hips, knees, hands, and feet. It is one of the more common, advanced forms of arthritis and can cause significant pain and debilitation. There are a variety of treatments for osteoarthritis, including non-surgical and surgical remedies.

Learn more about osteoarthritis on our General Orthopaedics page.

Osteonecrosis

Osteonecrosis, also referred to as avascular necrosis, is a condition characterized by the loss of blood to the bones, ultimately causes bone tissue death. It often affects areas of the knees, hips, and elbows, and can cause significant pain. Although the exact cause of osteonecrosis is not known, stress fractures or trauma may be a contributing factor. Fluid build-up within the bone may also be a cause of diminished blood supply. Some cases of osteonecrosis may also be linked with obesity, steroid therapy, sickle cell anemia, and lupus. The condition can ultimately lead to severe osteoarthritis and limited range of motion. Pain and swelling can be leading indicators of osteonecrosis. Non-surgical treatment for early stages of osteonecrosis includes medication, physical therapy, reducing activity that involves the affected area, and possibly a temporary brace. Surgical treatment may include cleansing of the joint, knee replacement, and procedures designed to reduce pressure on the surface of the bone.

Shoulder Joint Replacement

Shoulder joint replacement is not a very common procedure, but it can be used to treat those experiencing osteoarthritis, arthritis after injury, rheumatoid arthritis, osteonecrosis, severe fracture, avascular necrosis, and other conditions affecting the shoulder joint. Patients who may need shoulder joint replacement often have a loss of cartilage and a deterioration in the mechanical abilities of the joint, ultimately causing pain and even stiffness, as well as impaired function and mobility. They may also be experiencing a grinding or grating sound when moving the shoulder.

Non-surgical treatment for shoulder joint arthritis include medication, rest, and exercise. Physical therapy and anti-inflammation medication can also help in some cases. Surgical treatments to replace the shoulder joint vary according to the severity of the condition and the individual patient’s needs. Total replacement involves the insertion of an artificial ball-and-socket mechanism to replace the arthritic joint surfaces. However, some patients may require less invasive surgery to improve mobility and lessen pain. There is a recovery period after surgery that will require the use of an arm sling for about 4-6 weeks. Driving cannot be undertaken for at least six weeks after surgery. Shoulder joint replacement surgery is known to be extremely effective at helping patients increase range of motion and significantly reduce pain in the shoulder.

Wrist Joint Replacement

Wrist joint replacement can help those affected by arthritis, injury, disease, or infection in the wrist. These conditions can cause cartilage between bones in the wrist to wear down. This can become very painful and cause stiffness, swelling, and difficulty gripping objects. Wrist joint replacement involves removing the ends of the bones that have are exhibiting worn-out cartilage and replacing them with artificial joints. The procedure can be performed as an outpatient. A cast will be required for the first several weeks after surgery, followed by a protective splint for the following six to eight weeks. Patients will need to perform routine exercises with the wrist after the splint is removed in order to improve strength. Follow-up appointments (about once a year) after surgery is generally recommended to ensure the artificial joints and implants are working properly.

Click on the image below to download ‘Joint Replacement’ FAQ’s with Dr. Schott


Driving Directions To Our Locations

All Star Orhtopeadics has three convenient locations near: